Infusion
Nursing Notes
By Nufactor

Infusion Nursing Notes by Nufactor provides education, resources and support to promote successful patient therapy within the infusion nursing community.

Managing IVIG-Related Side Effects

Intravenous Immune Globulin (IVIG) infusions are generally well tolerated. Most associated side effects are mild and managed with multiple approaches which may include pre-medication, clinical consultation providing education on what to expect with infusion, ongoing monitoring of infusions, and modifications to the individualized patient infusion protocol if side effects occur. [More]

Management of SCIG Side effects

The greatest advantage of subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIG) is that it provides the patient with autonomy, which helps them feel empowered to live a normal life. Nurses are responsible for teaching patients how to manage the expected side effects. Most patients do not require premeds; if they are ordered, advise your patient to be compliant with them. Always ensure the anaphylaxis kit is readily available for each infusion regardless of past tolerability. It should consist of a double pack epinephrine autoinjector and oral Benadryl. Please instruct the patient how to use it properly before leaving their home. [More]

Who To Call and When: A Guide to Communication With The MD and Pharmacist Part 1

By Michelle Greer, RN, IgCN.

In the support of our patients in the homecare setting, it is imperative as nurses that we know when to notify the physician and pharmacist for patients receiving immune globulin therapy. IG therapy does have side effects, and it is important to recognize them and know what to do. Every patient will react differently to IG therapy. Some patients may experience no side effects at all, while others may have mild to moderate reactions. This goes for both IV and SC therapy. The management of IVIG and SCIG infusion side effects is crucial to the overall tolerability of IG therapy. [More]

Pre-visit/Visit Preparation: Vital Tasks for a Successful Infusion

By Michelle Greer, RN, IgCN and Cindi Berry, RN, BSN.

When working in homecare, preparing to see your patient for intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) therapy can be challenging and requires a good deal of preparation. Many times, it is up to you, the registered nurse, to put together some of the information prior to seeing your patient. This information includes doctor visit notes, current orders prescribed by the doctor, specialty pharmacy orders and supplies, and knowing the type of therapy that will be administered in the home. In addition, since there are many different brands and doses of IG, you should be familiar with both of these prior to seeing your patient in the home. [More]

Side Effects of IG Therapy: How to Prevent and Manage Them

By Cindy Berry, RN, BSN.

This week's IGL Blog is sponsored by NuFACTOR Speciality Pharmacy.

Immune Globulin (IG) therapy is used to treat many different diseases. Because the drug itself can have many side effects when administered, it is important for patients to understand what to do when facing side effects from therapy to ensure a treatment is well tolerated. [More]

IVIG Side Effects

Do you know what the “expected” and “unexpected” side effects of intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) therapy are? More importantly, do you know how to manage them? [More]