Infusion
Nursing Notes
By Nufactor

Infusion Nursing Notes by Nufactor provides education, resources and support to promote successful patient therapy within the infusion nursing community.

Managing IVIG-Related Side Effects

Intravenous Immune Globulin (IVIG) infusions are generally well tolerated. Most associated side effects are mild and managed with multiple approaches which may include pre-medication, clinical consultation providing education on what to expect with infusion, ongoing monitoring of infusions, and modifications to the individualized patient infusion protocol if side effects occur. [More]

Management of SCIG Side effects

The greatest advantage of subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIG) is that it provides the patient with autonomy, which helps them feel empowered to live a normal life. Nurses are responsible for teaching patients how to manage the expected side effects. Most patients do not require premeds; if they are ordered, advise your patient to be compliant with them. Always ensure the anaphylaxis kit is readily available for each infusion regardless of past tolerability. It should consist of a double pack epinephrine autoinjector and oral Benadryl. Please instruct the patient how to use it properly before leaving their home. [More]

Pre-Medications Use, Side Effect Management & Intravenous Immune Globulin

By Joe DiStefano, RPh.

Intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) preparations are safe and effective treatments for a variety of medical conditions. Serious, but uncommon reactions occur, and include thromboembolic events, (e.g., pulmonary embolism, deep vein thrombosis, myocardial infarction, transient ischemic attack), renal dysfunction and acute renal failure. Mild to moderate side effects that occur during or after IVIG treatment are more common. These may include: headache, flushing, chills, myalgia, fatigue, low grade fever, changes in blood pressure and lower back pain. While many common side effects may be controlled by decreasing the IVIG infusion rate, administering physician-prescribed pre-medications can [More]