Infusion
Nursing Notes
By Nufactor

Infusion Nursing Notes by Nufactor provides education, resources and support to promote successful patient therapy within the infusion nursing community.

The Curlin Pump

By Candy Finley, RN, IgCN and Joe DiStefano, RPh.

NuFACTOR Specialty Pharmacy programs pumps specifically to the patient orders. Always verify the patient's order with the pump program. Pumps are sent out in Variable Mode, which means the pump will titrate up on its own as it has been programmed. Remember to attach the vented spike adaptor to the spike of Curlin tubing. Per our policy, after spiking three vials, the nurse must use a new spike adaptor and Curlin tubing as they become dull and it is nearly impossible to separate them. [More]

Management of Anaphylaxis

By Joe DiStefano, RPh.

Regardless of past tolerance to immune globulin (IG), a patient can have a reaction to any dose. Taking prescribed pre-medications and taking oral ones approximately 30 – 60 minutes before IG can help minimize or eliminate common adverse reaction such as headache and flu-like symptoms. While uncommon but serious, an anaphylaxis reaction can also occur and is the reason to always have the anaphylaxis kit readily available for use. [More]

The Role of the Clinical Pharmacist

By Amy Ehlers, BS, PharmD, BCPS.

Historically, the pharmacist's role in healthcare has been limited to filling and dispensing drugs based on a prescription, and ensuring that these medications were accurately delivered to patients. Today, this is no longer true. As the healthcare system has grown and evolved, so has the role and responsibility of the pharmacist. It is now expected that "pharmacists establish relationships with patients to ensure the appropriateness of medication therapy, patients' understanding of their therapy, and to monitor the effects of that therapy." [More]

Pre-Medications Use, Side Effect Management & Intravenous Immune Globulin

By Joe DiStefano, RPh.

Intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) preparations are safe and effective treatments for a variety of medical conditions. Serious, but uncommon reactions occur, and include thromboembolic events, (e.g., pulmonary embolism, deep vein thrombosis, myocardial infarction, transient ischemic attack), renal dysfunction and acute renal failure. Mild to moderate side effects that occur during or after IVIG treatment are more common. These may include: headache, flushing, chills, myalgia, fatigue, low grade fever, changes in blood pressure and lower back pain. While many common side effects may be controlled by decreasing the IVIG infusion rate, administering physician-prescribed pre-medications can [More]

Who To Call and When: A Guide to Communication With The MD and Pharmacist Part 1

By Michelle Greer, RN, IgCN.

In the support of our patients in the homecare setting, it is imperative as nurses that we know when to notify the physician and pharmacist for patients receiving immune globulin therapy. IG therapy does have side effects, and it is important to recognize them and know what to do. Every patient will react differently to IG therapy. Some patients may experience no side effects at all, while others may have mild to moderate reactions. This goes for both IV and SC therapy. The management of IVIG and SCIG infusion side effects is crucial to the overall tolerability of IG therapy. [More]

Peripheral IV Access: A Lost Art?

By Candy Finley, RN, IgCN & Michelle Greer, RN, IgCN.

Peripheral intravenous access catheters are a commonly used IV device for patients receiving infusion therapy at home. They are primarily used for administration of medications, fluids and/or blood products, and occasionally blood sampling. Long term and daily therapies have created a need for indwelling catheters, and PIV's are becoming less common. As a result, the skills required to properly access a vein with a catheter that can stay in place without complications have become somewhat "rusty." [More]